Thursday, October 8, 2009

Eleven Ways to Avoid an Extremely Bad Singularity - Rebuttal




This is a rebuttal to some of the ways proposed by Ben Goertzel to prevent a negative singularity, I suggest you read his orginal post At H+ Magazine's blog first.




Eleven Ways to Avoid an Extremely Bad Singularity

4. Virtual world AGI sandbox 
Im all for the sandbox idea, only this would only be done by those that choose to do it. How would you enforce all AGI systems to remain in isolated computers without some form of policies set into place. Unstable experimental AGI should be worked on systems with no Internet access of any kind. A single terminal and no access to robots. All scientist working with AGI systems would be monitored to make sure they are not carrying the code out of the system.  


3-AGI and/or upload panspermia 
This is the only one I sort of agree with, only if the worlds that are "seeded" are germinated with "current" humans not transhumanist or posthumans. Seeding worlds with posthumans would not mean that the human legacy survives but instead humanity's offspring. Also the humans may very well still go on to create the transhumanist and posthumans, therefore you can say that humans are the sperm for even greater intelligence. Another reason that suggest worlds should be seeded with humans instead of posthumans is that starting a civilization at or near the singularity could very well also get them wiped out. Starting out with a more human base may give them the needed time to send out there own DNA prior to there singularity, resulting in a cosmic circle of life.  


9. Make a machine that puts everyone in their personal dream world
Sounds like your calling for the creation of "Digital Heaven" not to be confused with the matrix. No it will be a digital nirvana, where things like crime, poverty, and money will be a thing of the past! A virtual synthetic paradise prison for the mind. I view this as a negative singularity in itself. sure we still exist but in a way that seems to geared towards pleasure seeking only.  


10. Engineer a very powerful nonhuman AGI that has a beneficial goal system 
This sounds like a modified version of the "Be friendly to humans problem"  


11. Let humanity die the good death
Not an option! At it's core humanity could serve as seeds of greater intelligence. Considering the multiplicity of ways humanity could evolve it's intelligence suggest that many positives outcomes could arise from starting with a human base vs starting with a posthuman base for greater intelligence.

Eleven Ways to Avoid an Extremely Bad Singularity - Rebuttal




This is a rebuttal to some of the ways proposed by Ben Goertzel to prevent a negative singularity, I suggest you read his orginal post At H+ Magazine's blog first.




Eleven Ways to Avoid an Extremely Bad Singularity

4. Virtual world AGI sandbox 
Im all for the sandbox idea, only this would only be done by those that choose to do it. How would you enforce all AGI systems to remain in isolated computers without some form of policies set into place. Unstable experimental AGI should be worked on systems with no Internet access of any kind. A single terminal and no access to robots. All scientist working with AGI systems would be monitored to make sure they are not carrying the code out of the system.  


3-AGI and/or upload panspermia 
This is the only one I sort of agree with, only if the worlds that are "seeded" are germinated with "current" humans not transhumanist or posthumans. Seeding worlds with posthumans would not mean that the human legacy survives but instead humanity's offspring. Also the humans may very well still go on to create the transhumanist and posthumans, therefore you can say that humans are the sperm for even greater intelligence. Another reason that suggest worlds should be seeded with humans instead of posthumans is that starting a civilization at or near the singularity could very well also get them wiped out. Starting out with a more human base may give them the needed time to send out there own DNA prior to there singularity, resulting in a cosmic circle of life.  


9. Make a machine that puts everyone in their personal dream world
Sounds like your calling for the creation of "Digital Heaven" not to be confused with the matrix. No it will be a digital nirvana, where things like crime, poverty, and money will be a thing of the past! A virtual synthetic paradise prison for the mind. I view this as a negative singularity in itself. sure we still exist but in a way that seems to geared towards pleasure seeking only.  


10. Engineer a very powerful nonhuman AGI that has a beneficial goal system 
This sounds like a modified version of the "Be friendly to humans problem"  


11. Let humanity die the good death
Not an option! At it's core humanity could serve as seeds of greater intelligence. Considering the multiplicity of ways humanity could evolve it's intelligence suggest that many positives outcomes could arise from starting with a human base vs starting with a posthuman base for greater intelligence.

Eleven Ways to Avoid an Extremely Bad Singularity - Rebuttal




This is a rebuttal to some of the ways proposed by Ben Goertzel to prevent a negative singularity, I suggest you read his orginal post At H+ Magazine's blog first.




Eleven Ways to Avoid an Extremely Bad Singularity

4. Virtual world AGI sandbox 
Im all for the sandbox idea, only this would only be done by those that choose to do it. How would you enforce all AGI systems to remain in isolated computers without some form of policies set into place. Unstable experimental AGI should be worked on systems with no Internet access of any kind. A single terminal and no access to robots. All scientist working with AGI systems would be monitored to make sure they are not carrying the code out of the system.  


3-AGI and/or upload panspermia 
This is the only one I sort of agree with, only if the worlds that are "seeded" are germinated with "current" humans not transhumanist or posthumans. Seeding worlds with posthumans would not mean that the human legacy survives but instead humanity's offspring. Also the humans may very well still go on to create the transhumanist and posthumans, therefore you can say that humans are the sperm for even greater intelligence. Another reason that suggest worlds should be seeded with humans instead of posthumans is that starting a civilization at or near the singularity could very well also get them wiped out. Starting out with a more human base may give them the needed time to send out there own DNA prior to there singularity, resulting in a cosmic circle of life.  


9. Make a machine that puts everyone in their personal dream world
Sounds like your calling for the creation of "Digital Heaven" not to be confused with the matrix. No it will be a digital nirvana, where things like crime, poverty, and money will be a thing of the past! A virtual synthetic paradise prison for the mind. I view this as a negative singularity in itself. sure we still exist but in a way that seems to geared towards pleasure seeking only.  


10. Engineer a very powerful nonhuman AGI that has a beneficial goal system 
This sounds like a modified version of the "Be friendly to humans problem"  


11. Let humanity die the good death
Not an option! At it's core humanity could serve as seeds of greater intelligence. Considering the multiplicity of ways humanity could evolve it's intelligence suggest that many positives outcomes could arise from starting with a human base vs starting with a posthuman base for greater intelligence.

Toward a Science of Consciousness 2010


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15pG0Axhr9s



Part of the TransAlchemy interview with Stuart Hameroff

visit his web site at
http://www.quantumconsciousness.org/

we are accepting donations to cover this event. We would bring you great HD content from the event if we are able to go.

Toward a Science of Consciousness 2010


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15pG0Axhr9s



Part of the TransAlchemy interview with Stuart Hameroff

visit his web site at
http://www.quantumconsciousness.org/

we are accepting donations to cover this event. We would bring you great HD content from the event if we are able to go.

Toward a Science of Consciousness 2010


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15pG0Axhr9s



Part of the TransAlchemy interview with Stuart Hameroff

visit his web site at
http://www.quantumconsciousness.org/

we are accepting donations to cover this event. We would bring you great HD content from the event if we are able to go.

2B or not to be?

By: Aaron Franz
transalchemy.com






TransAlchemy recently attended the Woodstock Film Festival where we interviewed IEET executive director James Hughes, attended a panel discussion entitled "Redesigning Humanity," and watched a transhuman themed film entitled 2B. We will be bringing you more material concerning this event soon, but for now I am going to present you with a movie review of 2B.


As is the case with many other films that are currently being released, 2B is a transhumanist public relations effort. The film's own synopsis explains that: "This film is an entertainment designed to jump-start the conversation about the moral and religious questions raised by the bio-tech revolution." The intention of this and other such films is to familiarize the public mind with the concepts of transhumanism, to get a "buzz" going.


The film quickly jumps into the thick of things by introducing a new posthuman bee-ing, or "transbeman." Mia 2.0 is this being, and she quickly learns what it means 2B or not to be from her "father" Tom Mortlake. As you can see, there are a whole lot of bees buzzing around in this film, although the film never does confront the subject of the 'hive mind" directly. Mortlake is an enterprising CEO who decides to improve the human race through the use of high technology. A true alchemist, he is described in the film as a magician. The magician decides to create a "magic box" which will enable him to live forever. In the process of doing so his "daughter" Mia refers to his life as a "fairy tale."






James Remar as Mortlake, and Jane Kim as Mia


In one of the most interesting parts of the film Mortlake engages a mass audience of people by way of a television broadcast. His purpose is to save everyone watching, to show them "the way." He decides to address his audience in song as he begins playing guitar and singing out for everyone to "step into the light." Now what sort of transhuman film would be complete without a reference to "the light?" Not a good one, that's for sure, and this film does not disappoint in this regard. What happens next is a pivotal plot point of the film which I will leave up to you to see for yourself.


The film goes on to follow the exploits of Mia as she comes in contact with an influential blogger who resents Mortlake for his deeds. He is an unfortunate character whose attempts at selling an unauthorized biography of Mortlake result in tough times. His name is Clay, and appropriately enough his opinion of Mortlake is reshaped rather quickly. This is one part of the film that the audience at Woodstock Film Festval had a problem with. It wasn't clear what made Clay change his mind so quickly. I agree with this criticism, but also understand that this sort of thing is typical when it comes to clay. Clay can be formed, and Mortlake is a master sculptor.




Kevin Corrigan as Clay

In addition to building Mia, Mortlake also created an Ai to help him with his task of recreating the human race. This Ai looked very much like Kubrick's character HAL 9000. It's name was Dave, which is yet another a reference to 2001: A Space Odyssey. In 2001, the main character who interacts with HAL is named Dave. The fact that this computer's name is actually the human's name from 2001 was taken by me to be symbolic of a role reversal of sorts. It humanized what was originally a nonhuman character. HAL was scary, but this Dave character was more approachable.


2B wraps up in an attempt to address the issue of posthuman rights, the moral question of whether or not such beings should end up having equal rights to humans. In my opinion this message seemed tacked on, but overall the film was well done. The symbolism is absolutely off the charts. I don't want to give away the whole film, so I will hold back on going into any more detail. Now it is your turn to watch the film.


We had the privilege of speaking with 2B screenwriter Eric Nadler after the screening. We should B posting this footage soon. 2B continued...









2B or not to be?

By: Aaron Franz
transalchemy.com






TransAlchemy recently attended the Woodstock Film Festival where we interviewed IEET executive director James Hughes, attended a panel discussion entitled "Redesigning Humanity," and watched a transhuman themed film entitled 2B. We will be bringing you more material concerning this event soon, but for now I am going to present you with a movie review of 2B.


As is the case with many other films that are currently being released, 2B is a transhumanist public relations effort. The film's own synopsis explains that: "This film is an entertainment designed to jump-start the conversation about the moral and religious questions raised by the bio-tech revolution." The intention of this and other such films is to familiarize the public mind with the concepts of transhumanism, to get a "buzz" going.


The film quickly jumps into the thick of things by introducing a new posthuman bee-ing, or "transbeman." Mia 2.0 is this being, and she quickly learns what it means 2B or not to be from her "father" Tom Mortlake. As you can see, there are a whole lot of bees buzzing around in this film, although the film never does confront the subject of the 'hive mind" directly. Mortlake is an enterprising CEO who decides to improve the human race through the use of high technology. A true alchemist, he is described in the film as a magician. The magician decides to create a "magic box" which will enable him to live forever. In the process of doing so his "daughter" Mia refers to his life as a "fairy tale."






James Remar as Mortlake, and Jane Kim as Mia


In one of the most interesting parts of the film Mortlake engages a mass audience of people by way of a television broadcast. His purpose is to save everyone watching, to show them "the way." He decides to address his audience in song as he begins playing guitar and singing out for everyone to "step into the light." Now what sort of transhuman film would be complete without a reference to "the light?" Not a good one, that's for sure, and this film does not disappoint in this regard. What happens next is a pivotal plot point of the film which I will leave up to you to see for yourself.


The film goes on to follow the exploits of Mia as she comes in contact with an influential blogger who resents Mortlake for his deeds. He is an unfortunate character whose attempts at selling an unauthorized biography of Mortlake result in tough times. His name is Clay, and appropriately enough his opinion of Mortlake is reshaped rather quickly. This is one part of the film that the audience at Woodstock Film Festval had a problem with. It wasn't clear what made Clay change his mind so quickly. I agree with this criticism, but also understand that this sort of thing is typical when it comes to clay. Clay can be formed, and Mortlake is a master sculptor.




Kevin Corrigan as Clay

In addition to building Mia, Mortlake also created an Ai to help him with his task of recreating the human race. This Ai looked very much like Kubrick's character HAL 9000. It's name was Dave, which is yet another a reference to 2001: A Space Odyssey. In 2001, the main character who interacts with HAL is named Dave. The fact that this computer's name is actually the human's name from 2001 was taken by me to be symbolic of a role reversal of sorts. It humanized what was originally a nonhuman character. HAL was scary, but this Dave character was more approachable.


2B wraps up in an attempt to address the issue of posthuman rights, the moral question of whether or not such beings should end up having equal rights to humans. In my opinion this message seemed tacked on, but overall the film was well done. The symbolism is absolutely off the charts. I don't want to give away the whole film, so I will hold back on going into any more detail. Now it is your turn to watch the film.


We had the privilege of speaking with 2B screenwriter Eric Nadler after the screening. We should B posting this footage soon. 2B continued...









2B or not to be?

By: Aaron Franz
transalchemy.com






TransAlchemy recently attended the Woodstock Film Festival where we interviewed IEET executive director James Hughes, attended a panel discussion entitled "Redesigning Humanity," and watched a transhuman themed film entitled 2B. We will be bringing you more material concerning this event soon, but for now I am going to present you with a movie review of 2B.


As is the case with many other films that are currently being released, 2B is a transhumanist public relations effort. The film's own synopsis explains that: "This film is an entertainment designed to jump-start the conversation about the moral and religious questions raised by the bio-tech revolution." The intention of this and other such films is to familiarize the public mind with the concepts of transhumanism, to get a "buzz" going.


The film quickly jumps into the thick of things by introducing a new posthuman bee-ing, or "transbeman." Mia 2.0 is this being, and she quickly learns what it means 2B or not to be from her "father" Tom Mortlake. As you can see, there are a whole lot of bees buzzing around in this film, although the film never does confront the subject of the 'hive mind" directly. Mortlake is an enterprising CEO who decides to improve the human race through the use of high technology. A true alchemist, he is described in the film as a magician. The magician decides to create a "magic box" which will enable him to live forever. In the process of doing so his "daughter" Mia refers to his life as a "fairy tale."






James Remar as Mortlake, and Jane Kim as Mia


In one of the most interesting parts of the film Mortlake engages a mass audience of people by way of a television broadcast. His purpose is to save everyone watching, to show them "the way." He decides to address his audience in song as he begins playing guitar and singing out for everyone to "step into the light." Now what sort of transhuman film would be complete without a reference to "the light?" Not a good one, that's for sure, and this film does not disappoint in this regard. What happens next is a pivotal plot point of the film which I will leave up to you to see for yourself.


The film goes on to follow the exploits of Mia as she comes in contact with an influential blogger who resents Mortlake for his deeds. He is an unfortunate character whose attempts at selling an unauthorized biography of Mortlake result in tough times. His name is Clay, and appropriately enough his opinion of Mortlake is reshaped rather quickly. This is one part of the film that the audience at Woodstock Film Festval had a problem with. It wasn't clear what made Clay change his mind so quickly. I agree with this criticism, but also understand that this sort of thing is typical when it comes to clay. Clay can be formed, and Mortlake is a master sculptor.




Kevin Corrigan as Clay

In addition to building Mia, Mortlake also created an Ai to help him with his task of recreating the human race. This Ai looked very much like Kubrick's character HAL 9000. It's name was Dave, which is yet another a reference to 2001: A Space Odyssey. In 2001, the main character who interacts with HAL is named Dave. The fact that this computer's name is actually the human's name from 2001 was taken by me to be symbolic of a role reversal of sorts. It humanized what was originally a nonhuman character. HAL was scary, but this Dave character was more approachable.


2B wraps up in an attempt to address the issue of posthuman rights, the moral question of whether or not such beings should end up having equal rights to humans. In my opinion this message seemed tacked on, but overall the film was well done. The symbolism is absolutely off the charts. I don't want to give away the whole film, so I will hold back on going into any more detail. Now it is your turn to watch the film.


We had the privilege of speaking with 2B screenwriter Eric Nadler after the screening. We should B posting this footage soon. 2B continued...









My Riddles

Dear Antz Particleion Is Hacking your Universe (live)

I will give your universe/Mind back to you if you answer my riddles.

Call your answers in!

(305) 735-9490

A) Is your universe real?

B) Are you real?

C) Who currently has {source}?

D) What is {Root}?

When you got the answer email it to

Key.universe@gmail.com

and I will give you back your universe assuming your right ;-)

Rules subject to change but will be posted.

`

! It will be Billions of years till I let you just have it... Till then I urge you try to get your key back.