Thursday, August 26, 2010

Brain dumping Incognito

My computer along side a good chunk of my research has been stolen/ kidnapped.. I believe what occurred today was a ploy created by my uncle to get my computer stolen so I would not be able to get online.. This or an attempt at shutting down my online doings...


Seriously... I beat you to the punch dennis.. I already changed all my passwords on a remote computer in a library. and have I have hijacked your desktop to update my brain dump.

Seriously lets quit playing games.. You can't possibly understand what Im doing and thus will no longer even share my work with you anymore. Im planning my "escape from new york" I wanted to settle down work and build money for the magnum opus although I have come to terms that even that is a mental construct.. "Unification" has already been achieved... I don't need to externally express it. And possibly this is what the universe is trying to teach me.

Short from the clothes on my back all my stuff has been stolen... my ids my wallet my external drive with all my singularity footage, all my business cards... (have a back up plan)

//Temporal reflections

IN my wake to deceive people with my erratic behavior I have done to great of a job..All of my cursing is not out of anger and fustrations entirely but out of wanting to put people off and continue my work in plain site.

Trust me when I tell you that I get a kick out of doing this live.. It's part of the game/challenge... Imagine if newton blogged live while he invented calculus.. LOL well this is far more complex..

also while im at it let me explain something super quick before I get caught using the computer

When I say im going to fuck your universe up.. This is an extremely philosophical statement...

If Im able to create a theory that radically changes our view of the cosmos.. then yes I would have drastically "fucked" things up! and I plan too the universe is broken and your world view of the cosmos is pathetic to me. so Im planning to fuck the cosmos up... LOL

I will be brain dumping into paper till I get my computer back or steal one! LOL

Thoug shall not steal I know I know .. but this is super important.. the universe is at stake here... well your universe!

oh and those that wonder why I dont spell check and grammar check this blog is because this blog is a rapid fire brain dump...

Ps come get your key back antz!

The Hardwired Myth



Scientism is that nifty term that sounds like scientology, but actually has nothing to do with it. It may even be a defunct term. But if historicity proves just how elastic actual history is, than scientism proves the same thing about science. Just about every subject can be misappropriated to meet the personal agenda of mass persuasion, but one would think science would be the exception to that rule. It isn’t.

Science has its own language that, when used, certifies most any argument presented to layman ears. The neutral, factual tone that lacks inflection tells us that the speaker has a disciplined perspective that has not been clouded or compromised by subjectivity. When a scientist publishes his or her research, they depersonalize their findings by removing any indication of "I" therefore dodging the implication of non-objective interpretation. The result of this is a body of information that seems to have happened all on it own, as if there were no human being present to sort out, assemble and, yes, interpret the data. Everyone from news reporters to college students make use of the vapid voice of depersonalized observation.This approach can even feel empowering. The observed becomes our intellectual property which we exploit for research. That research is then licensed by everyone else to be used as factoids and anecdotes. Scientism is born.

The human brain may be the most popular subject in Scientism. Despite just how little we know about the Brain and that ever evasive thing called consciousness, there is still no shortage of certitudes about how we, that is, the human race, is “hardwired” to think and behave. Hardwired is that catch-all phrase for any discussion on the mechanical, clock-work brain. When all else fails and the mysteries of cognition have you backed into a corner, look to the answer-all term as your exit strategy: Hardwired.

“It’s because we’re hardwired to ___________.” Fill in the blank and you’re all set.

Sadly, most people accept this misconception of the brain. Strangely, this misconception has seen many metaphoric upgrades. "Hardwired" is simply our latest metaphor. At the start of the twentieth century the brain was a camera, and after that a telephone switchboard. Now it is a "hardwired" computer. The brain has been a lot of things in the mind of men, except just a brain. Our impulse to shoehorn the brain into technological metaphors can be simply explained: we know almost squat about the brain and how it works, but we know a great deal about the workings of our own technology. Many of us struggle hopelessly with the vagaries of our existence. We do not sit well with life’s mysteries, and will continue to contract our definitions of life until they fit snuggly within the limitations of our imagination. Retrofitting the little that we know about the brain into metaphors of man-made utilities guides us in our quest to knowing more about the brain. Of course, this approach could be guiding us in the wrong direction ...again. Yes, we've been up this road before. Think religion. Religious text is rife with metaphors many of which were used for the same purpose of trying to shoehorn the inexplicable into images that made sense.

Science too has leaned on metaphors and models, sometimes to give themselves a picture of their abstractions and sometimes to give a picture to a confused public. The Man as Machine began with Descartes who, taking a cue from the automatons of his day, "proposed that the bodies of animals be regarded as nothing more than complex machines." This metaphor became so popular that it is no longer used as one. Instead, when we speak of a clock-work body, we are being quite literal. The models of the human body tend to simplify (or over simplify) its many parts. These "parts" are explained to us in such a way that when summed up they very logically and conveniently equal the whole. If only it were that simple. On the contrary, many of the body's "parts" are, by themselves, wholes. The cell is a perfect example. Richard C. Strohman Ph.D, in his often cited essay "Genetic Determinism as a failing paradigm in biology and medicine" refutes the over-simplified depiction of cells as work engines: "The Cell", he writes, "is beginning to look more like a complex adaptive system rather than a factor floor of robotic gene machines." Genes are another example. The tendency to associate every human nuance to a gene – a gay gene, a criminal gene, an artist gene – are part of this human habit of modeling the body and brain after our own Input-Output technology. Apparently, the genome is just as dynamic as the brain and scientists are still looking at both scratching their heads wondering “what the heck is that?”

And yet the hardwired myth, like the clock-work body, endures. Everyone seems to know that the brain is hardwired, except the brain itself. Even the term "softwired" might be too hard for a brain that has a hard time staying put. We may not know much about consciousness, but we do know that the brain is constantly rewiring itself as new experiences are indulged and new memories formed. Just as the renewal process of cells means that your current body is not the one you were born with, so it with our brains. It is not a static calculator constrained by its own hardware. With billions of neurons that have just as many synaptic possibilities, the brains anatomical ability to self-upgrade is virtually infinite. It is the limits of our imagination that compel us to place cognitive restrictions on the brain.

Guess we're just hardwired to do that.

Republished from www.sniffcode.com

The Hardwired Myth



Scientism is that nifty term that sounds like scientology, but actually has nothing to do with it. It may even be a defunct term. But if historicity proves just how elastic actual history is, than scientism proves the same thing about science. Just about every subject can be misappropriated to meet the personal agenda of mass persuasion, but one would think science would be the exception to that rule. It isn’t.

Science has its own language that, when used, certifies most any argument presented to layman ears. The neutral, factual tone that lacks inflection tells us that the speaker has a disciplined perspective that has not been clouded or compromised by subjectivity. When a scientist publishes his or her research, they depersonalize their findings by removing any indication of "I" therefore dodging the implication of non-objective interpretation. The result of this is a body of information that seems to have happened all on it own, as if there were no human being present to sort out, assemble and, yes, interpret the data. Everyone from news reporters to college students make use of the vapid voice of depersonalized observation.This approach can even feel empowering. The observed becomes our intellectual property which we exploit for research. That research is then licensed by everyone else to be used as factoids and anecdotes. Scientism is born.

The human brain may be the most popular subject in Scientism. Despite just how little we know about the Brain and that ever evasive thing called consciousness, there is still no shortage of certitudes about how we, that is, the human race, is “hardwired” to think and behave. Hardwired is that catch-all phrase for any discussion on the mechanical, clock-work brain. When all else fails and the mysteries of cognition have you backed into a corner, look to the answer-all term as your exit strategy: Hardwired.

“It’s because we’re hardwired to ___________.” Fill in the blank and you’re all set.

Sadly, most people accept this misconception of the brain. Strangely, this misconception has seen many metaphoric upgrades. "Hardwired" is simply our latest metaphor. At the start of the twentieth century the brain was a camera, and after that a telephone switchboard. Now it is a "hardwired" computer. The brain has been a lot of things in the mind of men, except just a brain. Our impulse to shoehorn the brain into technological metaphors can be simply explained: we know almost squat about the brain and how it works, but we know a great deal about the workings of our own technology. Many of us struggle hopelessly with the vagaries of our existence. We do not sit well with life’s mysteries, and will continue to contract our definitions of life until they fit snuggly within the limitations of our imagination. Retrofitting the little that we know about the brain into metaphors of man-made utilities guides us in our quest to knowing more about the brain. Of course, this approach could be guiding us in the wrong direction ...again. Yes, we've been up this road before. Think religion. Religious text is rife with metaphors many of which were used for the same purpose of trying to shoehorn the inexplicable into images that made sense.

Science too has leaned on metaphors and models, sometimes to give themselves a picture of their abstractions and sometimes to give a picture to a confused public. The Man as Machine began with Descartes who, taking a cue from the automatons of his day, "proposed that the bodies of animals be regarded as nothing more than complex machines." This metaphor became so popular that it is no longer used as one. Instead, when we speak of a clock-work body, we are being quite literal. The models of the human body tend to simplify (or over simplify) its many parts. These "parts" are explained to us in such a way that when summed up they very logically and conveniently equal the whole. If only it were that simple. On the contrary, many of the body's "parts" are, by themselves, wholes. The cell is a perfect example. Richard C. Strohman Ph.D, in his often cited essay "Genetic Determinism as a failing paradigm in biology and medicine" refutes the over-simplified depiction of cells as work engines: "The Cell", he writes, "is beginning to look more like a complex adaptive system rather than a factor floor of robotic gene machines." Genes are another example. The tendency to associate every human nuance to a gene – a gay gene, a criminal gene, an artist gene – are part of this human habit of modeling the body and brain after our own Input-Output technology. Apparently, the genome is just as dynamic as the brain and scientists are still looking at both scratching their heads wondering “what the heck is that?”

And yet the hardwired myth, like the clock-work body, endures. Everyone seems to know that the brain is hardwired, except the brain itself. Even the term "softwired" might be too hard for a brain that has a hard time staying put. We may not know much about consciousness, but we do know that the brain is constantly rewiring itself as new experiences are indulged and new memories formed. Just as the renewal process of cells means that your current body is not the one you were born with, so it with our brains. It is not a static calculator constrained by its own hardware. With billions of neurons that have just as many synaptic possibilities, the brains anatomical ability to self-upgrade is virtually infinite. It is the limits of our imagination that compel us to place cognitive restrictions on the brain.

Guess we're just hardwired to do that.

Republished from www.sniffcode.com

The Hardwired Myth



Scientism is that nifty term that sounds like scientology, but actually has nothing to do with it. It may even be a defunct term. But if historicity proves just how elastic actual history is, than scientism proves the same thing about science. Just about every subject can be misappropriated to meet the personal agenda of mass persuasion, but one would think science would be the exception to that rule. It isn’t.

Science has its own language that, when used, certifies most any argument presented to layman ears. The neutral, factual tone that lacks inflection tells us that the speaker has a disciplined perspective that has not been clouded or compromised by subjectivity. When a scientist publishes his or her research, they depersonalize their findings by removing any indication of "I" therefore dodging the implication of non-objective interpretation. The result of this is a body of information that seems to have happened all on it own, as if there were no human being present to sort out, assemble and, yes, interpret the data. Everyone from news reporters to college students make use of the vapid voice of depersonalized observation.This approach can even feel empowering. The observed becomes our intellectual property which we exploit for research. That research is then licensed by everyone else to be used as factoids and anecdotes. Scientism is born.

The human brain may be the most popular subject in Scientism. Despite just how little we know about the Brain and that ever evasive thing called consciousness, there is still no shortage of certitudes about how we, that is, the human race, is “hardwired” to think and behave. Hardwired is that catch-all phrase for any discussion on the mechanical, clock-work brain. When all else fails and the mysteries of cognition have you backed into a corner, look to the answer-all term as your exit strategy: Hardwired.

“It’s because we’re hardwired to ___________.” Fill in the blank and you’re all set.

Sadly, most people accept this misconception of the brain. Strangely, this misconception has seen many metaphoric upgrades. "Hardwired" is simply our latest metaphor. At the start of the twentieth century the brain was a camera, and after that a telephone switchboard. Now it is a "hardwired" computer. The brain has been a lot of things in the mind of men, except just a brain. Our impulse to shoehorn the brain into technological metaphors can be simply explained: we know almost squat about the brain and how it works, but we know a great deal about the workings of our own technology. Many of us struggle hopelessly with the vagaries of our existence. We do not sit well with life’s mysteries, and will continue to contract our definitions of life until they fit snuggly within the limitations of our imagination. Retrofitting the little that we know about the brain into metaphors of man-made utilities guides us in our quest to knowing more about the brain. Of course, this approach could be guiding us in the wrong direction ...again. Yes, we've been up this road before. Think religion. Religious text is rife with metaphors many of which were used for the same purpose of trying to shoehorn the inexplicable into images that made sense.

Science too has leaned on metaphors and models, sometimes to give themselves a picture of their abstractions and sometimes to give a picture to a confused public. The Man as Machine began with Descartes who, taking a cue from the automatons of his day, "proposed that the bodies of animals be regarded as nothing more than complex machines." This metaphor became so popular that it is no longer used as one. Instead, when we speak of a clock-work body, we are being quite literal. The models of the human body tend to simplify (or over simplify) its many parts. These "parts" are explained to us in such a way that when summed up they very logically and conveniently equal the whole. If only it were that simple. On the contrary, many of the body's "parts" are, by themselves, wholes. The cell is a perfect example. Richard C. Strohman Ph.D, in his often cited essay "Genetic Determinism as a failing paradigm in biology and medicine" refutes the over-simplified depiction of cells as work engines: "The Cell", he writes, "is beginning to look more like a complex adaptive system rather than a factor floor of robotic gene machines." Genes are another example. The tendency to associate every human nuance to a gene – a gay gene, a criminal gene, an artist gene – are part of this human habit of modeling the body and brain after our own Input-Output technology. Apparently, the genome is just as dynamic as the brain and scientists are still looking at both scratching their heads wondering “what the heck is that?”

And yet the hardwired myth, like the clock-work body, endures. Everyone seems to know that the brain is hardwired, except the brain itself. Even the term "softwired" might be too hard for a brain that has a hard time staying put. We may not know much about consciousness, but we do know that the brain is constantly rewiring itself as new experiences are indulged and new memories formed. Just as the renewal process of cells means that your current body is not the one you were born with, so it with our brains. It is not a static calculator constrained by its own hardware. With billions of neurons that have just as many synaptic possibilities, the brains anatomical ability to self-upgrade is virtually infinite. It is the limits of our imagination that compel us to place cognitive restrictions on the brain.

Guess we're just hardwired to do that.

Republished from www.sniffcode.com

My Riddles

Dear Antz Particleion Is Hacking your Universe (live)

I will give your universe/Mind back to you if you answer my riddles.

Call your answers in!

(305) 735-9490

A) Is your universe real?

B) Are you real?

C) Who currently has {source}?

D) What is {Root}?

When you got the answer email it to

Key.universe@gmail.com

and I will give you back your universe assuming your right ;-)

Rules subject to change but will be posted.

`

! It will be Billions of years till I let you just have it... Till then I urge you try to get your key back.